Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Review of "The Suspect and other tales," a collection of short stories by K. Morris



Summary:
Tales of the unexpected, ranging from stories of crime and vengeance through to ghostly happenings in an ancient mansion.

Review:
A pleasant collection of flash fiction length pieces.  The stories are engaging and fun to read, though a bit simplistic with their twist endings.  Most veteran crime readers will be able to predict the ending of each story before it happens.  With some polish I could see Morris' style becoming quite thought-provoking.

Still, the flash fiction was written well.  Each story was a complete experience and didn't feel rushed, which I appreciated.  It's worth picking up a copy if you want an easy afternoon read.

3/5 stars
Reviewed by Alain Gomez

Buy this collection on Amazon.

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Common Writing Mistake: Show, Don't Tell

They say that more than half of our communication comes from non-verbal cues.  Naturally, this has led to a hundred studies trying to figure out exactly how much communication is verbal.  But you get the idea.  Suffice to say that if you were to watch a movie and put the sound on mute you could still generally tell what sorts of emotions the characters are experiencing.

Unfortunately, this is something that tends to get easily lost during the writing process.  Writing is about words... the verbal part of communication, right?

Wrong.

To me, the most memorable books are the ones that create a world for you to become lost in.  You love the characters because they seem real even if the setting is in an alternate universe.  In order for that setting to become real the writer must give the reader non-verbal details to latch on to.

For example, telling the reader that a character is angry doesn't create much of an impact.  How angry is angry?  Forcing the character to stand by and watch his farm burn to the ground shows the injustice.  The writer doesn't even have to say that the character is angry if the setting is done correctly.  The farm was the character's home.  Anyone would be angry if their home was burned to the ground for no reason.

Show the reader, don't tell the reader.

I believe that new writers tell details because it's easier than showing.  Saying that the Lord of Darkness is evil is much easier than writing out a scene describing his ruthless distribution of justice.  But the end result for the reader will be completely different.  Telling me what emotions I am supposed to feel creates detachment from the story.  Remember that a reader does not have to care about your characters just because you, the writer, care.  Readers must be made to care, which means that empathy must be created.



Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Common Writing Mistakes Seen During Beta Reading

I've been beta reading for authors for quite some time now.  It has been an interesting process, to say the least.  I love that it allows me to meet fellow authors that are all in a different stage of their writing career.  The process of helping them has, in turn, helped me a great deal.  Beta reading forces me to take a much closer look at the flaws in my own writing and to try and figure out ways to fix these issues.

What's interesting to me is that many writers suffer from the same mistakes while working through that first novel or short story.  I've done enough of these beta projects to now see patterns in what I come across.  So I thought it would be useful to do a blog series on these common mistakes.

In each blog post in this series I'll address the mistake and a possible solution to this type of mistake.  However, I feel the need to add a small disclaimer: I'm not a best selling author that makes millions of dollars from my writing.  Like countless others, I too struggle with this art.  My advice stems solely from personal experience and nothing more.

That said, stay tuned for more articles!

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Canceling Out the Distractions

My new favorite thing is noise canceling headphones.  I've had a pair for years but lately I've been using them to write.  Game changer!

I'm generally very focused once I get into a focusing zone.  However, everything about my brain requires long stretches of start up/shut down.  It takes me at least an hour to fully wake up in the morning (and that's with coffee) and when I go to sleep it's a several hour long process.  The same goes for focusing.  I can work for long stretches of time but calming down enough to actually get into the focusing zone can require some work.

So I took the advice of a friend and tried headphones with music.  I made myself a playlist of classic music--no words!  It took some getting used to.  I'm a musician so my first instinct when I hear music is to focus on it.  But I kept the volume turned down low and I made a point of having the music on only when I'm writing.  If I turned away to look at my phone or check my email, I paused the music.

Basically, I Pavlovian dog trained myself.

It's been hugely successful for me though.  The noise canceling headphones helped to cut down on the number of extraneous sounds I heard that could prove to be a distraction.  While I'm not necessarily writing any more per day, I am using my time more efficiently.  Once I sit down the music helps to put me in an "instant focus zone."  I now spend less time putzing around online trying to get myself into the proper frame of mind.

Next step: increase word counts!

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Review of "This Long Vigil," short story by Rhett C. Bruno



Summary:  
After twenty five years serving as the lone human Monitor of the Interstellar Ark, Hermes, Orion is scheduled to be placed back in his hibernation chamber with the other members of the crew. Knowing that he will die there and be replaced before the ship’s voyage is over, he decides that he won’t accept that fate. Whatever it takes he will escape Hermes and see space again, even if it means defying the regulations of his only friend -- the ship-wide artificial intelligence known as Dan.

Review:
Turning fifty is a mental milestone for most people.  But it's a bit more than that for Bruno's main character, Dan.  Fifty marks the end of his life.

This is a phenomenal short story.  Bruno cleverly touches on a number of everyday life and aging issues in a very short space of time.  The setting of the space ark traveling for 200 years to the next closest inhabited planet was brilliant.  Dan literally has nowhere he can go but forward, a perfect metaphor for life itself.

"The Long Vigil" is provoking but doesn't weight you down with questions.  It's sad but also hopeful.  And the best part was that the story left me thinking about it for hours after I finished reading.  Highly recommended.

5/5 stars
Reviewed by Alain Gomez

Buy this short story on Amazon.

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Getting Back Into the Word Count Saddle

Now that the wedding chaos has finally died down, I'm forcing myself back into a more intense writing schedule.  To my credit, I did keep up my daily writing!  How many words I got down on the page fluctuated greatly but Monday through Friday I would sit my butt in the chair and do something.

It was actually a nice way to spend the year.  I mentioned this before in earlier blogs but it allowed me the freedom to enjoy writing again.  I wasn't adding words for the word count sake, I was writing them because I liked the way they connected to each other.  Given everything else that was going on, it was perfect for the time.

But now it's not so perfect.

I have finally reached the mental state where publisher me has resurfaced.  Author me reigned supreme for too long!  The slowness in which I complete stories is now starting to bother me because it feels like I have too much to tell and never enough time to write.

So I'm forcing myself back into daily word counts again.  It feels good, actually.  I learned my lesson from my past writing schedule attempts: I kept the word count goal small.  Even though I had worked my way up to 800 words a day by the end of 2014, there is no way I would be able to just jump back into that without feeling frustrated.

As with everything, consistency is key.  Here's hoping that 2016 will see an uptick in Alain Gomez publications!

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Concept Behind "Tempered Flight" by Alain Gomez



So after a loooooong hiatus I finally resurrected the Calen Natari Saga with a second installment.  I admit that I had a bit of writer's block when it came to Calen's character.  I created her because I liked the initial, shallow idea of a bounty hunter/assassin.  That profession is always romanticized in science fiction because, let's be honest, it's ripe for adventures.  The scenario possibilities that the character can be placed in are literally endless.

But that is what caused the block.  I was fixated scenarios, which was the focus of book one.  I realized that scenarios are quickly going to become redundant if I don't go deeper.  I started to question who Calen really was as a character other than just a killing machine.

Tempered Flight was the result of those pondering.  Calen's weaknesses are delved into more.  She has flaws.  I'm liking the way this particular saga is headed.  It will be interesting to see her develop more.

Buy this story on Amazon.